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Eurasian Water Milfoil (EWM) is getting out of control

 

With summer here we need to be more careful about how we transfer our watercraft, trailers etc. from one water source to another. Eurasian Water Milfoil (EWM) is one of eight types of milfoil aquatic plants found in Michigan that is not native to Michigan. EWM has been in the US since the 1960’s. This invasive water plant grows quickly and forms a thick mat or canopy below the water and on top of the water. EWM kills off native plants, hinders fish, waterfowl and affects the water quality. The plants spread by floating on the water or attaching themselves to boats, motors, trailers, water crafts, bait buckets and fishing equipment. The EWM causes problems for boaters, swimmers and fishermen.

Lake organizations and local areas can effectively treat milfoil with selected chemicals early in the summer before plants flower. Some ponds and lakes find hand pulling and removing the milfoil from the water a simple and effective control method for small areas. Harvesting, raking or screening the bottom of the lake also works well. Several biologists are working on a biological control method for the EWM using aquatic weevils. They love to feed on the EWM in the water.


To stop EWM spreading you need to inspect and remove all dirt, plants and fish from your water equipment and you need to drain the water from all your equipment before transporting. For further information print the PDF file below from Michigangov. From an article by  Allison Fox University of Florida bugwood.org Eurasian Watermilfoil Invasive Species Alert - Printable PDF


If you think that someone you know could use this information please send it on. I have more safety tips and special non profit blogs on my Val Cares web page. Valerie Bomberger ABR, AHWD Re/Max Harbor Country.


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