Skip to main content

Home Safety 101 - Cooking

 Home Safety 101 - Cooking

Cooking brings family and friends together, provides an outlet for creativity and can be relaxing. But did you know that cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries? The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has put together a list of safety tips.  By following a few safety tips you can prevent these fires.


“Cook with Caution”

 • Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stovetop. 

• Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, boiling, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove. 

• If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. 

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — away from your stovetop. If you have a small (grease) cooking fire and decide to fight the fire... 

  1. • On the stovetop, smother the flames by sliding a lid over the pan and turning off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled. 

  2. • For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed. If you have any doubt about fighting a small fire… 

  3. • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire. • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number from outside the home


Cooking and Kids 

Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet (1 meter) around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

• The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking. 

• Most cooking fires in the home involve the kitchen stove.

The  NFPA has a great flyer for you to download on Cooking fires that covers all this information on it. I hope that this information will help keep your family and home safe. I thank the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) for their commitment to educating everyone on Cooking fires and its dangers.  If you know someone that could benefit from this information please forward it on. Check out my Val Cares Page on my website for more Safety Tips.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Understanding Pre-qualification and Pre-approval

  Buyers ask me all the time what the difference is between Pre-qualification and Pre-approval. If you are considering the purchase of a new home or selling your home, you may be concerned with the issue of finance. If you are a buyer obtaining the right mortgage is a key step in the home buying process, but it does not have to be a stress inducing one. Talk to your lender before you make an offer. Most lenders offer pre-qualification, pre-approval, or both to help you know where you stand. Get Prequalified and be up front about the source of your down payment money. A good lender will explain the true costs of borrowing to you so you can comfortably afford the home you want as well as the monthly payments. Sellers should always ask if a buyer that wants to see their house is already pre-qualified. Pre-qualification: Is a preliminary estimate of how much you can afford to pay for a home based on information you provide. Because credit and employment information are not validated fo

Understanding how the down payment for buying a home works

Down Payment 101 A down payment is a very important first step in buying and owning your own home. Having a down payment is a good sign that you’re ready to tackle home ownership and likely be able to handle the monthly expenses that come with home ownership; including the monthly mortgage payments, property taxes and any repairs that come up. Mortgage lenders require a down payment to help offset their risk. The larger the down payment the less they end up losing if they foreclose. If a buyer puts down less than 20% they will have to get private  mortgage insurance (PMI). This insurance repays the lender a portion of the loan if it goes into default. You will need to remember that PMI insurance will increase your monthly mortgage payments. The size of the down payment can affect your interest rate. Most mortgage lenders will offer a lower rate to buyers with larger down payments. The money for a down payment can come from several sources: From your own savings Gifts from f

Why Work with a Real Estate Agent?

  Should I Hire a Buyer's Agent? Yes.     Real estate agent is a professional in a field where most buyers and sellers are novices. This is likely the largest single purchase you will ever make. After all, how often do you drop a quarter of a million dollars or more on a shopping spree? Home buying and selling is full of pitfalls that can be avoided with an agent to provide you with expert assistance, knowledge of the market and negotiation skills. Your agent is the unbiased voice of reason who brings objectivity to the table. An agent helps sellers see past their emotional connection to their home and helps buyers deal with a multiple bid situation. Your agent can recommend a good independent home inspector who can provide a list of repair needs. Then, the agent will help evaluate which repairs are reasonable and which are excessive as you get your home ready to sell. Your agent also has contacts with excellent contractors to make the necessary repairs. Determining t